Interview with Dan Janik, Publisher at Savant Books and Publications

danWelcome, Dan. Tell us, what made you go into publishing?

A desire to “pay back”—to other new and struggling writers—for the years of help I received during my early writing career. As such, we tend to focus on introducing “new” authors to the reading public.

What is the general background of your company?

Savant Books and Publications publishes works of enduring literary quality “with a twist” that ultimately transforms a reader’s established point-of-view. Our general target audience is high-school/first year college educated readers of American English worldwide but offer up our work to anyone just in need of a great story! We focus especially on North America, Canada, Europe, India, Australia, New Zealand and other English reading countries.

Are you getting from the business what you hoped to, monetarily as well as non-monetarily?

Yes. Savant’s business model was designed to be successful during “good” and “bad” times and it continues to prove such. We continue to be debt free and look forward to the publishing challenges of the years ahead!

How has the eBook revolution affected your business?

Ebooks have proven a mixed blessing. First, they save trees. At least that’s the idea. A second strongly positive blessing is that by virtue of being digital, the internet-delivered work is “fresh” and “new,” and less expensive rather than warehoused and shipped printed books.

Finally, a digital work can be machine-read, making an eBook also available as an audio book. The downside is that there frequently exists no verifiable information on sales (hence one has to totally rely on what the eBook “printer” reports which themselves are open to “creative accounting”). In addition, profiles of eBook purchasers suggest they tend to collect rather than read eBooks, rarely recommend good reads to colleagues and hardly ever do reader book reviews. Hence, it is difficult for early authors depending heavily on eBooks as a primary venue to garner that necessary “critical mass” of readership to establish author name and title recognition—the two most important issues for a new or early author.

Another somewhat larger issue is that of “self-publishing” within the eBook arena. The current tendency is for the quality of an eBook read to vary widely, affecting potential readers’ opinions of reading in the eBook venue. A bigger issue is the shift of emphasis from quality and service to more business-like product sales. In general this translates to an even more inhuman approach to publishing success in the eBook business. Finally, eBooks, as their Digital Management Rights (DRM) are frequently tightly associate with a digital “reader,” discourage decentralization and small business, which has always been the very “heart” of publishing.

Do you have a plan to survive since new ebook publishers are springing up every day?

We will continue to emphasize quality and service. In addition, we have our own bookstore(s) and offer our books in eBook format one year after they are released in softcover printed format. We are also working on developing an “a-Book” to be sold in bookstores.

Some people think that with more titles available today than at any other time in history, the novel as an art form is dying. Do you agree? Disagree?

I agree that more titles are available today, making “publishing” almost a whole new animal. I disagree that the novel format is dying. It is certainly changing with the new generation stressing visual elements (i.e. favoring “comic book” and/or “manga” style reads over purely printed word craft), much shorter length (e.g. “flash fiction” and “chapterized” internet works) over the traditional novel format, but the novel, per se, isn’t disappearing, it’s being refined and redesigned as will every “new” generation.

Do you publish anything or just certain genres?

Genre-wise, we publish widely; however, we do not publish gratuitous violence or sex, and favor historically-based fiction.

What, in your opinion, are the essential qualities of a good story?

We have a slightly different emphasis, calling a desirable product a “good read”. While a great storyline is essential, it is the writing of the story that distinguishes a “good read” from a less desirable one. When a target reader finds him or herself reading the work without pause (e.g. to reclarify a word, phrase or sentence), we at Savant consider the work a “good read”.

What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

Let go of hubris and vanity, and focus on word craft and service. It through service that one will garner the “critical mass” of readers necessary today to establish author name and work title recognition.

Who are the authors you have published so far?

Savant has been fortunate enough to publish the work of really great writers—all talented, with numerous award winners. We’ve also published CD’s of music, so don’t just think we’re all print books.

If anything has made it all worth it, it’s been being able to work with such a great eclectic group of writers. I wish I could name them all but, just to name a few: David Seaburn, Gloria Schumann, William Maltese, A.G. Hayes, S. Stanley Gordon, Helen Doan, and many, many more!

What do you do to sell the books you publish, for example, where do you advertise?

We’ve found traditional advertising and marketing ineffective, being more akin to gambling than investing. This is the key. Gambling means we give people money in the hope of better return without any guarantee of return of the principal. Investing, which we favor, means we give people money in the hope of a better return with guarantee of return of our principal. This is another “revolution” that has only just begun throughout the financial and business world that is going to strongly affect publishing.

Do you set up signings for the authors and then publish the ‘tour’?

Yes. We maintain our own bookstore(s) where authors are encouraged to have book release and author introduction parties. We also allow Savant Books and Publications to host theme and genre- related “parties”. We strongly encourage authors to do the same, offering them copies of their books and those of other Savant authors for 50% off the Suggested Retail Price.

How do you acquire your talent?

We maintain an open (unsolicited) manuscript submission policy, couple our submissions with a required 16-question questionnaire—which we take seriously. All submissions are read. Many are submitted, few are chosen.

Where can we learn more about you, your authors, and the books you publish?

Visit our website at http://www.savantbooksandpublications.com! You can also find us on all regular social media streams to see what’s new!

Thank you for telling us about Savant Books and Publications, Dan. Best of luck for a long and literary future!

Savant

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Peter Coleborn, Publisher at The Alchemy Press

Peter ColebornWelcome, Peter. What made you go into publishing?

This is something I often ask myself … pause here for contemplation and a cup of coffee. I used to do a lot of work for The British Fantasy Society when I edited and produced, among other things, Winter Chills, Dark Horizons and the FantasyCon Programme Books. Then it occurred to me to do something I wanted rather than for the society (nothing against the BFS – I still work for them). And at that time the UK’s National Lottery was keen to give away money – so I obtained a grant and THE PALADIN MANDATES, a collection of stories about a ghost hunter, by Mike Chinn became our first book in 1998. Since then I’ve published a select few books (select because of time and financial constraints) – culminating in three anthologies launched at the World Fantasy Convention last month, and a book by Rod Rees: INVENT-10N due this month.

How do you decide to publish one book and not another? If some of the classics were subbed to you, would you have pubbed them or snubbed them?

Basically, I have to like the idea / book. I am a great fan of short stories and so the Press concentrates in that area – anthologies and collections. I also want to provide a place for up-and-coming writers to find a place to be published, as long as they are good enough. It’s nice that people are coming to me with ideas, but those constraints I mentioned above get in the way. As for the “classics”? Of course I’d’ve published most of them. It would be great if the current Alchemy titles become classics…

How has the eBook revolution affected your business?

Personally, I dislike eBooks. But I recognise that they are becoming more and more popular and so The Alchemy Press will produce both print and electronic versions. And if it brings in money to fund further projects then all power to the Kindle or Kobo or whatever. I have, in fact, published two novellas for the Kindle – no hard copies as yet.

Some people think that with more titles available today than at any other time in history, the novel as an art form is dying. Do you agree? Disagree?

If more titles are published then the novel isn’t a dying art. But what is occurring is that more books that are being published are not edited, or poorly edited, and that does lower the tone for all of us. Just because one can self-publish (or get shoddy work published elsewhere) it doesn’t mean that they should. Once the manuscript is written and self-edited, it should be edited by a person with good English and a sense for story before publication. That shouldn’t be a guideline – it should be the law (said with a smile on my face).

What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

Write, put it away for a few weeks, read it again with a dispassionate eye, edit/rewrite … get a second opinion/editor (not your best friend). Join a writers’ group. And read lots. I’m amazed at the number of want-to-be writers I meet who don’t read books.

Who are the authors you have published so far?

Back at the start of The Alchemy Press I published a collection of linked stories by Kim Newman, WHERE THE BODIES ARE BURIED, plus a collection of poems by Jo Fletcher, SHADOWS OF LIGHT AND DARK. Then in 2011 I published RUMOURS OF THE MARVELLOUS by Peter Atkins. All were signed limited editions – including Neil Gaiman for his introduction in the Fletcher collection.

Otherwise it’s mostly affordable anthologies: THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF ANCIENT WONDERS and THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF PULP HEROES in 2012; THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF URBAN MYTHIC, THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF PULP HEROES 2 (spot the theme) and ASTROLOGICA: STORIES OF THE ZODIAC this year. Also in 2013: DOORS TO ELSEWHERE, a fascinating collection of essays about fantasy and horror writers of the early 20th century, by Mike Barrett. And as mentioned earlier: INVENT-10N, a dystopian novella by Rod Rees.

For 2014 I have lined up two collections, three anthologies (including THE ALCHEMY PRESS BOOK OF PULP HEROES 3 and KNEELING IN THE SILVER LIGHT, stories commemorating the Great War) and another book of essays. Fingers crossed.

As you can see, these books are in the fantastic arena. I have published one non-fantasy novel; SEX, LIES AND FAMILY TIES by Sarah J Graham, a fascinating and moving account of a young woman coming of age in 1970 Britain.

What do you do to sell the books you publish, for example, where do you advertise? Can we find your books in stores or are they just online?

That is an excellent question and one that is difficult to answer – simply because I haven’t found a place yet that produces cost-effective results (cost of advertising versus increased income). Mostly I use forums, etc. I also send out many review copies but even a 5 star review doesn’t always cause a spike in sales. If anyone has the answer please share it. Alchemy Press books are available via Amazon, Barnes & Noble online, etc, and if bricks-and-mortar shops wish to sell them they are available via the usual sources – or via me.

Has the availability of POD and E-books made it easier for you to publish more client’s work since you no longer have to invest in large runs, shipping, etc?

Yes, definitely (and especially as far as POD is concerned). I have had boxes of unsold books in my garage for far too long (now given away since I grew sick of seeing all those lovely books just wasting away). Now I only need a small stock and the quality of the POD service I use is very high (not the cheapest, though).

How do you acquire your talent? Open Submissions? Recommendations? Reading Periods? Placing Ads?

I have never liked closed markets. It feels wrong. So the Press’s anthologies are open to all even though we might ask writers who we know if they wish to submit something. As for collections – if someone has an idea… (But the schedule for 2014 is full.)

Do you charge your authors for any services?

Most definitely not. In fact, I pay the writers but I only pay a nominal amount plus a copy of the book. If The Alchemy Press becomes mega-successful I will increase the payments accordingly. I am amazed and appalled by publishers that do not even supply a copy of the book to their writers. Although the small presses are not professionals it pays us to be as professional as possible.

Where can we learn more about you, your authors, and the books you publish?

The Alchemy Press website is here: http://alchemypress.wordpress.com/ (the website is still in development). Use the drop down menus to access our catalogue, submission details, contact details, etc. And you’ll also see that we try to do mini-interviews with our writers – all part of the community.

Joe Mynhardt, Publisher at Crystal Lake Publishing

Crystal Lake PublishingWelcome, Joe. What made you go into publishing?

My biggest goal in life is to make writing and creating books my main focus, so it felt like the most logical step to take. I had all the right connections and information to get the first project (For the Night is Dark) off the ground… and after that it just took off. With each project Crystal Lake Publishing becomes more efficient and popular.

How has the eBook revolution affected your business?

Although our paperbacks are quite popular (some with interior artwork), it’s our eBooks that are selling the best. I was lucky enough to take advantage of the eBook revolution. It also saves me as a publisher a lot on posting, as I can now send dozens of review copies not only for free, but instantly. I can also do a lot more giveaways and competitions, since my expenses are limited. It’s also nice to be able to give the buyers more options, especially if that option is cheaper.

What challenges do you and your company face?

Two things, Pat, time constraints and visibility. Since I’m a full time teacher and coach, and still spend time on my own stories, it’s tough going at times. A lot of my work as a publisher/editor consists of replying on emails, building connections, reading, studying the market, connecting with fans and reviewers, as well as searching the internet for readers, whether they’re on blogs or review sites. I’m also spending a lot of time reading up on social media and online marketing, while working on my own craft.

Which brings me to the second problem, getting noticed. It doesn’t help publishing top quality books with gripping stories and covers if no one knows about them. So I spend a lot of time on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Goodreads and various other forums, not just advertising the books, but establishing a brand. It takes time, but every bit forward is a step in the right direction.

What is the easiest part of being a publisher?

Meeting new people, whether they’re readers writing reviews, authors sending me their biographies or fans just telling me how much they love the company and what we’re doing. I’m a very approachable publisher (although we work on an invite-only basis), and I love chatting with people online. I do a bit of freelance editing to fund some of the projects, but the joy of helping an author with their next book and sharing my knowledge is the most rewarding thing I’ve ever done.

I have to add that, although Crystal Lake Publishing is invite-only, I am open to authors/artists sending me their biographies with links to their work. I love to study authors, see how they progress, and then bring a bunch of them together for a suitable project. I like introducing authors to each other, as well, which in the long run not only improves the project we’re working on, but manages to bring us all together as a kind of literary family or fellowship (sounds corny, right?).

What are your goals for the company, your authors, and your readers?

I’d have to say more high-quality books in various formats, including hardcover and audiobooks. My main goal at the moment is to make people aware of the company and what we represent, and in doing that introduce the reading public to the talented authors out there.

What are your future plans? What will you bring to the literary world besides more stories?

Entertainment and of course scary books by top-notch and up-and-coming authors. I already mentioned venturing into audiobooks and hardcovers, but I’m also working on presenting our books in all types of eBooks. I’m also working on a few top-secret projects with recognized authors, as well as working on my second book.

Who knows where it will end or what direction Crystal Lake Publishing will go into next. I see thrillers and fantasy in the near future, as well as a few YA books.

As the company grows, my main goal (yes, I have a lot of main goals) will be to pay the authors and artists what they deserve: a lot!

Who are the authors you have published so far?

When it comes to short story collection and novellas, I’ve published Daniel I. Russell, Paul Kane, Kevin Lucia and Gary McMahon. Future projects include William Meikle and two surprise authors for 2014 (top secret, for now).

Can we find your books in stores or are they just online?

Amazon is our main supplier, but the books are available to all online and brick and mortar bookstores. I’m also working on getting the books into South African stores and online retailers, thus introducing our authors to a horror-loving South African market.

Why should readers check out the books you publish?

Not only will they travel out of the ordinary day-to-day life on a journey of fantasy and wonder, but they’ll be entertained, scared, surprised and awed, wanting more yet feeling satisfied, and feeling like part of the Crystal Lake family.

How do you acquire your talent?

As I mentioned, I work on an invite-only basis, but I also accept author biographies and recommendations by others. I keep my eye on the current authors and those making positive waves. I’ll read their work and make notes, and once I have a theme and a cover, I’ll start emailing folks, either for anthologies, collections or novellas. So if you’re making a name in the horror genre, I’ve probably already noticed you, but it wouldn’t hurt sending me a bio, just in case.

Where can we learn more about you, your authors, and the books you publish?

You can check out our books, authors, reviews, blogs, interviews, upcoming projects and amazing artwork at our website: http://www.crystallakepub.com.
We’re also on Twitter (https://twitter.com/crystallakepub) and Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/Crystallakepublishing)

Thanks for helping me spread the word about Crystal Lake Publishing and our authors, Pat.

I’m always glad to do what I can to help independent publishing companies, Joe. Best of luck!

Corinne A. Dwyer, Publisher at North Star Press

Welcome, Corinne. What made you go into publishing?

It was in my DNA.

What is the general background of your company?

logoNorth Star Press was begun by my inlaws in 1969. I came into the firm in 1976. In the early years we did just a few books a year. Now, for 2014, we have 80 books contracted. We are a typical royalty small press in Central Minnesota and specialize in Minnesota Fiction (set in Minnesota and surrounding states), Minnesota History, Memoirs, Poetry, and Outdoor Books. We publish adult, YA, and some (a few select few) children’s picture books. I work with my daughter as my right-hand-woman. We have a staff of six.

How has the eBook revolution affected your business?

All our books, published in trade paperback or hard covers, are made into ebooks.

Some people think that with more titles available today than at any other time in history, the novel as an art form is dying. Do you agree? Disagree?

The novel isn’t dying. How can it? Storytelling has been around since cavemen days. It’s always going to be with us. How it’s presented is the only thing that might change.

What is your perfect author/client?

Our perfect author is hard-working, professional, dedicated to his or her book(s), enthusiastic, and endlessly creative.

What challenges do you and your company face?

Our challenges are growth, market share, and getting paid.

What is the most difficult part of being a publisher?

Sometimes the hardest thing we have to deal with as a small press publisher is being taken seriously. We’re not a big, New York house (and really don’t want to be), but we’re real, have been around a long time, and plan on making the transitions (whatever they are) to the future.

What is the easiest part of being a publisher?

The easiest part of being a publisher—passion. We love what we do.

What is the most rewarding part of being a publisher?

The most rewarding thing for me and handing a new author his or her first book for the first time. It’s very moving.

What are your goals for the company, your authors, and your readers?

Our goals are: for our company—growth; for our authors—satisfaction and growth in their careers; and for our readers—that they look for us because they know we publish quality books.

Where can we learn more about you, your authors, and the books you publish?

To learn more about us, go to northstarpress.com.

Thanks for the opportunity to get the word out about North Star Press — Corinne A. Dwyer, publisher

Kristofer J Stamp, Publisher at StoneGarden.net Publishing (Interview)

Welcome, Kristofer. Thank you for answering my questions. What made you go into publishing?

I saw a great number of people trying to break into publishing. It seemed like the only voices that were being heard were those that were ALREADY being heard, with no room for innovation. The only option in those days was vanity publishing, and the thought that quality writers were being extorted in such a way was something that did not make any sense to me. When I got my first real computer in the mid 1990′s and got a chance to learn about the internet StoneGarden.net Publishing was born.

What is the general background of your company?

We opened our doors in 1998 publishing downloadable electronic books. We have grown many times over through the years and now produce both traditional paperback novels and ebooks.

How do you decide to publish one book and not another? If some of the classics were subbed to you, would you have pubbed them or snubbed them?

Submissions go through a multiple review process to ensure that the best of the best make it to the publishing phase. In essence, we publish what we like. If the writing is attracts our attention and the author has taken the time to listen to our guidelines we’ll publish. Some of the classics may not have made it through our process, and I’m sure we would have been weeping!

How has the eBook revolution affected your business?

It has allowed us to come back to our roots. We started publishing ebooks in 1998, and feel we have a great feel for how to produce an ebook that is easy on the eyes. I’m personally excited to see ebooks move into the mainstream; it really allows readers to have easy access to so many more exciting authors than they did only ten years ago.

What is the most difficult part of being a publisher?

Sending out rejection notices. StoneGarden.net Publishing prides itself on giving new authors a voice. Sometimes the submission just does not meet what we feel is a good story and we have to send out that rejection. It is definitely more fun to send an acceptance!

What is the most rewarding part of being a publisher?

Seeing readers enjoy the works that we produce is the most rewarding part of owning a publishing house.

Do you publish anything or just certain genres?

We publish nearly every genre, with the exception of children’s books.

What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

If I can tell an aspiring author anything it is this: Expect to work HARD to get your works into the hands of readers. You are going to spend many hours writing your book. Then you’ll spend MONTHS editing your book to have it ready for submission. You might be looking at months before your work makes it through their editing and layout process. Finally, your work will be ready, and you’ll be working harder than ever before. The end result is worth it, but the journey can be a tough one.

Who are the authors you have published so far?

We’ve published approximately 100 authors over the years: Michelle Belanger, Sylvia Shults, Donovan Galway, Gregory Miller and many, many others.

Why should readers check out the books you publish?

I hope that readers find our works worth reading! Our authors offer unique views on a wide array of topics and genres; we offer something for everyone. Our authors, editors and artists take a huge amount of pride in offering readers only the best.

What do authors do that drives you crazy?

Authors that don’t self promote drive me NUTS. Your publisher needs you to help in the promotional efforts; not every house has the ability to promote you like a Stephen King, so you need to be out there promoting yourself as well. Authors that don’t promote don’t sell.

Do you charge your authors for any services?

NO. All services from editing to layout to covers are done in house.

Where can we learn more about you, your authors, and the books you publish?

You can find us at our official site: http://www.stonegarden.net or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/stonegardenpublishing. Our books are available at all major online retailers and by special order at most brick and mortar bookstores.

C. A. Milson, co-owner of ASJ Publishing

Welcome, C. A.! What made you go into publishing?

The choice to be a publisher was the result of some bad choices and experiences I have had along the way since I was first published in 2008. My wife and I discussed the options, read alot of information of the industry and decided that it was the best choice for us to pursue.

What is the general background of your company?

ASJ Publishing was formed by my wife and I. ASJ are the initials of my wife’s name. We started the idea of ASJ Publishing in 2010, but it was not until this year when we started to take the idea public.

How do you decide to publish one book and not another?

We do get a few submissions, but not all of them we take on board. It is not an easy thing to deicde sometimes, but what it does come down to is the story has to be interesting; Not only for us but also for the readers

Some people think that with more titles available today than at any other time in history, the novel as an art form is dying. Do you agree?

I would have to disagree on that one. Writing a novel is never an easy task. I know, as I have wrote a few myself.  🙂 But as long as there are readers, the author has an audience. With the release of iPad’s, Android, taking the e-book to the reader has never become easier. So along with making a novel available in paperback, we can now make it available whether a person can get digital.

What challenges do you and your company face?

The only thing we face is more exposure to the market. Now while Facebook certainly has merits for sponsored ads, there is more to marketing than the internet. So it is finding that niche that we are focusing on in 2013/2014

What is the most rewarding part of being a publisher?

One of the rewarding things of being a publisher is seeing the work of our previously unpublished authors on print. Seeing the proof of their novella in our hands is a real rewarding experience, and we hope that our authors would feel the same, in seeing their work is out there.

Do you publish anything or just certain genres?

At the moment we are open to a wide range of genres, such as erotica, children’s, sci-fi, horror, drama, and also selected non-fiction and “how-to” titles.

What advice you would give to an aspiring author?

If you are an aspiring author, my advise is that you research the market. There are a number of publishers out there who will charge fees for reading your MS, and even charge bigger fees to publish your e-book. Believe me, I see the ads on facebook everyday. As an author myself, you have to question why a publisher would want to charge you fees to publish your work. Any reputable publisher will never do that.

Have you always wanted to be a publisher?

No. After I became a published author, my goal was to write more books, and live my life like that. But, life has a way of expanding one’s thinking, and in 2010, our life expanded not only to publishing, but also into the world of film.

What are your future plans? What will you bring to the literary world besides more stories?

For 2013, we are investing heavily into our writers, by getting their books to the main international book fairs, as well as some other ideas we have in the pipeline. We will also be filming 3 movies of our own.

What do you do to sell the books you publish, for example, where do you advertise?

Right now we are focusing on Amazon, Lulu, Kindle, and also our distribution network through Lightning Source/Ingram. We also run offers from time to time on Kindle for free download day to help boost sales, as well as run targetted facebook ads. There will be more in the way of advertising in 2013.

Can we find your books in stores or are they just online?

They are mostly online right now, but in Q1 of 2013, we will be taking that a step further by opening up to paperback sales through Ingram.

Why should readers check out the books you publish?

Our authors come from a wide range of backgrounds, from all walks of life, and they all have a great story to tell, whether it is a bedtime stroy for their children, or a horror story to scare themselves, or even a sizzling erotic novel to arouse their senses.

Are you satisfied with the financial return on your investment of time and resources?

Not yet. Any new business will take at least 2 years to see any ROI (Return on investment). That is just a plain fact of being in business. There is no such thing as “get rich quick”, unless you happen to win the lottery. But honestly, if you decide to be a publisher for the monetary rewards, then you’re in the wrong business.

Would you recommend anyone else go into the publishing business?

That would mean they would be competing with me. So no. 🙂

Has the availability of POD and E-books made it easier for you to publish more client’s work since you no longer have to invest in large runs, shipping, etc?

Not really as some books have different formatting requirements, as well as finding the right people to work with to create a good book cover or illustrations. Being a publisher is alot more than taking someone’s MS, publishing it on Kindle and giving a copy to the author. No, it is alot more. There are editors to hire as well as illustrators and graphic artists. The book cover (or illustrations n a children’s book) has to be perfect, and the editor has to know their job to have the manuscript polished and ready. Sure, anyone can do the former and do a half-assed job of publishing a book for the sake of it, but what kind of publisher would that make them?

What can you offer a writer in terms of brand and marketing that makes your percentage worth the author’s while?

Going to blow our own trumpet here Pat if you don’t mind What we do for authors is not only have their MS ready for publication, but also we send their book to the international book fairs, create a facebook page for their book, pay for sponsored ads, get a professional book trailer made (for selected titles)

Do you set up signings for the authors and then publish the ‘tour’?

While we do a few things already, we do ask our authors to set up any “virtual book tours”

How do you acquire your talent? Open Submissions? Recommendations? Reading Periods? Placing Ads?

Right now we are placing various ads and we do have an open submission process.

Do you charge your authors for any services?

Absolutely not.

Where can we learn more about you, your authors, and the books you publish?

People can find out more about us at: http://www.asjpublishing.com